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Other Romantics

This year I gave myself the task of reading more deeply in the 'minor' Romantics. Whether for good or bad, I didn't do a Romantic Studies MA (opting for theory and interdisciplinarity instead), and despite carving out a bit of a niche in Romantic women's writing, I have generally stayed pretty canonical and this was an attempt to patch a few holes.

As usual with these things, life got a little bit in the way (I still have a forlorn and unopened edition of Hazlitt on my shelf), but here are the links to the seven authors I did manage to have a good crack at:


And, although it's cheating somewhat, since I did this research for a talk at the Royal Cornwall Museum, a bit on William Lisle Bowles:

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